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? >> no. if you take a look at the gun laws we have, i don't even think president obama is proposing more gun laws. we have to make sure we enforce our laws. we have laws that aren't being properly enforced. but the best thing to help prevent violent crime in inner cities is to bring opportunity in inner cities. is to help teach people good discipline, good character. that is civil society. that's what charities and churches do to help one another make sure they can realize the value in one another. >> you can do that by cutting taxes? >> those are your words, not mine. >> thank you very much, sir. >> that was kind of strange. trying to stuff words in people's mouths? >> it it sounds like you're -- >> ryan folks putting the paper in front of the camera and everything. vice presidential nominee paul ryan getting annoyed in this interview with terry camp in flint, michigan. the campaign even after the interview was over still went out of their way to trash the reporter that paul ryan walked out of that interview on. the campaign given on the record quotes calling
might address that gap. [laughter] there are six products of harvard law school and three products of yale law school on the supreme court. there are apparently no other law schools in the united states. [laughter] besides those two. no, it is a bizarre and unfortunately fact, i think. but those are, i hope, interesting facts about the supreme court. but frankly, i don't think they're very important. here's an important fact. about the supreme court. there are five republicans and four democrats. i will speak for somewhat longer, but this is basically all you need to know. [laughter] if be there's a takeaway here, i have gotten to the point early. there are five republicans and four democrats, and that really tells you much of what you need to know. and it is true that the justices wear robes because they're supposed to look all alike, and they're supposed to look, you know, it's supposed to give the perception that they're all pretty much the same, but just as on the other side of first street the united states congress is deeply divided according to party, so is the united states
't need sharia in the constitution. he has everything he needs in the laws of the united states, because i see them being in great continuity. and for instance, the law, the press law of 1975 is enough to implement any anti-blasphemy laws, for instance. you don't need to implement sharia to go against blasphemy, or even to constraint expression public, freedom of expression. so in a way i'm optimistic, of course, about tunisia but cautiously optimistic. because i think what you see there is the continuity of the old state. it doesn't seem that there are any intentions to change the institutions of the old state. which, in fact, are very useful for both tunis and another to reshape society for tunis and a modernist direction, and for another in an islamist one. so i will stop here, and i look forward to our discussions. thank you spent thank you very much, malika. that was a model, superb analysis and remedy at the same thing. i also have a sign here that says please continue. i'm not exactly what i use that particular sign. but i'm trying to figure that out. it's rather intimidating. gina,
because labor rolls -- rules. it is the epa and the laws. >> regulation. >> it is not just uncertainty. it is fear of the worst-case scenario coming down the pike. the worst-case scenario is that you do not do with this and their unbalanced tax system. you let the regulatory regime continue to squelch entrepreneurs. you don't take seriously our long-term energy needs and demands and create an affordable and reliable supply of north american energy. >> you fly right off the fiscal cliff. >> it was a shocking experience for a lot of people to go back a few months. the first time we hit the debt ceiling, all the seven whether you were a lender or somebody here who is proud of the way this country had managed to fair, all the sudden policy makers are running right at to the edge. you cannot pay your bills. there is nobody in business that would be allowed to walk away like that. what we're saying is that people in charge of both parties said it takes leadership and the execs -- in the executive branch. it takes leadership. the decisions have to be made. i see governors in both parties have
campaign finance should be regulated, the current state of affairs is that the law is unclear and no one knows if the decisions will stand or get knocked down. it is insane, the wild west. it bodes poorly for us to understand what powers are at work. it is worth mentioning the stock act recently passed which will have new information for us to sink our teeth into a realm financial disclosures. financial transactions have to be disclosed monthly. there are certain things in their we worry about. that is a whole nother set of information. the third thing i want to mention is how political power functions. , the structure of the political dialogue. right now it is a mess. this is not the rules committee fault. in ways it is obama's fault. this is something to think about as you think about how the house works and what kind of tools we should build on the outside. when i look at the different categories of congressional information, it to the things we worked hard on, one is taking advantage of political pressures that exist. nonprofits would love to be able to create political pressure. we
-- pill to swallow and the best way to get them to do that was to stress that this was the law. this was the rule of law and he is president was going to take care of the law. it made it much easier, and easier pill for the south to swallow. [applause] >> jonathan is great to be with you today and with all the booklovers at this fabulous festival and with a very distinguished biographer, jean edward smith way think has contributed immeasurably to the eisenhower scholarship and i have to agree he was underestimated definitely and i'm so glad that you have written such a powerful book. i think it's fascinating in reading the book to see that more of the book is focused on the military career, even though as you've just spent almost most of your time talking about the incredible eight years of of the eisenhardt registration, the estate leaned over and whispered to me i have never heard the interstate highway system applauded before. pretty exciting. first-time. >> all those people who were applauding are now going to get on 395 and be stuck in traffic or three hours. [laughter] po
significant to link them. his support for lincoln's policies are very important in the story is just an law so i thought it was time somebody brought that story to light. >> we are the maine state library in a public reading room and were going the maine author's collection. in the early 1920s, henry tunick who is the state laboring at the time started collecting books by maine writers trying to get them signed whenever possible and it has grown into this. >> welcome to maine's capital city on booktv. with the help of our time warner cable partners or the next 90 minutes we will explore the literary culture of this area as we visit with local authors and explore special collections that help tell the history of not only this state but the country as well. >> this is the first parish church in brunswick maine and it's significant to the story of uncle tom's cabin. in many plays places stories began here. it is here in this pew, pew number 23 that harriet beecher stowe by her account saw a vision of uncle tom dean clips to death. now uncle tom, as you probably know, is the title, the hero of her
on the political trail than it was about getting answers. it kind of seemed a little bit more like "l.a. law" than it did a hearing, an investigation, but i do think there were important things that came out yesterday. namely, eric nordstrom, the top u.s. security official in libya months before the attack had asked the state department for additional security. those requests were denied. and the state department official who actually handled those requests, charlene lamb, said that she did. and i think another thing that came out that was kind of interesting is that even as the republicans were charging that there wasn't enough security at the post, democrats did make an interesting point that under the house-controlled congress, there was, under republican controlled congress, sorry, there was a lot of budget cuts in the state department and embassy security. >> why she -- glad you brought that up. yesterday, serious accusations about not having enough assets and resources in place to protect our people. soledad o'brien asked right here on cnn, didn't you vote to cut the funding for embassy secu
three years in probation. tiffany was accused of paying a law firm employee $800 in state money. sounds like he is a theft and using state funds for her wedding. he will have to pay back $800 to the state. >>> a woman claims a sheriff deputy raped her at a local courthouse. more on her lawsuit and why she decided to go public with her story. also ahead tonight, quick thinking maryland teenagers jump into action after their bus driver passes out behind the wheel. tell us about their close call still ahead. >> i did everything they asked me to do, so i didn't think it was going be an issue. >> a terminally ill woman said she was humiliated. the embarrassing patdown that is getting national attention at 11:00. pamela howze: it just seems like such an... infringement on our lives. how dare they step into my life that way. it's none of their business. he's trying to restrict us, again. he's taking us backwards. george allen is the last thing we need in washington. anncr: the democratic senatorial campaign committee is... responsible for the content of this advertising. according to an inde
are your thoughts? >> caller: i just think it's unfortunate that today we need this kind of law we. look at the ayaan to leave the unemployment rate on its higher among black and it is white, so there's still discrimination going on in this country, and we still need this law. it's really unfortunate. >> host: will be in jacksonville florida, independent. your thoughts are next, willie. >> caller: yes, good morning. it must not be enough highly educated black institutions say i have to go to harvard to get a certain education. we don't have -- we reached the same criteria. we are still lacking and i get an education at the school. i just don't understand. they have no qualified school that is on the same level with these schools and professors on the same level. uc-irvine saying? >> host: here is the 28 president of the university of texas at austin writing in today's wall street journal traer. he writes history repeats itself when they are in an ironic way the university of texas goes before the supreme court to defend the missions. it lasted 62 years ago when he men's white and african
i went back to school. i enrolled in the university of san francisco law school. i got my j.d. and pass the bar. -- passed the gar. -- bar. [applause] san francisco has been my home. six years ago i was married here on the steps almost six years ago to this month. [applause] some are clapping, some are not. [laughter] it has been a fundamental time for my family and i having been nominated. by mayor ed lee and i am grateful to that community and i am grateful to the mayor and the board of supervisors who are considering this nomination. i vow to do the best job i possibly can for the city and i have -- as i have done from the outset of my city career. i will continue to draw inspiration and guidance from the black woman in our history and culture who have paved the way for me and others with their relentless fight against prejudice and intolerance and hate. there consummate energy, intelligence, and courage and their unshakeable persistence, unflinching sacrifice and unwavering faith. i have angels on my shoulder and they're my sisters. thank you and i wish you a happy and j
, demonstrators in favor of maryland's dream act rallied in support of that law. the legal immigrants would be allowed in state tuition rates if parents paid taxes and they attended local public schools. opponents say other taxpayers should not be made to foot the bill for people not here legally. andrea mccarren was at today's rally. >> i love this country. when i say home, i mean here. >> i do consider myself an american. >> up, up with education, down, down with deportation. >> they are among the so- called dreamers. students whose parents brought them into this country illegally. >> my mom even says that you are more american than spanish anymore. you still get confused in spanish words. i'm like yeah, i know. >> a cancer survivor who says his surgery at johns hopkins saved his life. rickie wants to share his gratitude. >> i have to give back to society. i think the way i want to do it is becoming a doctor and save lives, just as my life was saved once. >> opponents of the dream act call it a bad investment for maryland taxpayers. brad of help save maryland calls it criminal. an
the grandmother and build new education and yet segregation, jim crow law rose above it and insisted that his grandson's rise above its. fight, participate, eliminate but do not be consumed by it. in so many ways we talk about the founding fathers and yet the house fell in a way because of the contradiction and the generation rebuilds it. frederick others see -- frederick and others. do we today in our law and our culture give enough credit to that refunding? >> you think of the great moments in our history. we talk about of course the revolution, certainly the constitution that we celebrate now, 225 years. it was all coming apart and the country as we know today is reshaped after the civil war. the constitutional law what would it look like if there were no 14th amendment to the states. there is so much that goes beyond the war. i tell my clerks we have to go to gettysburg. this isn't just about pulling these little threads out of what we do every day about journalism and original was on and we argue it is much bigger than that. i see some people here who argue before the court. i'm not once
people actually in hotel conference rooms. there were people in legal, like law firm conference rooms so they could get an internet connection. they donated space. people working at starbucks where they could get an internet connection. people working at their kitchen tables frankly around town. so all of a sudden right around april 1st we start moving into our headquarters, finally. this is six weeks away from the announcement, maybe longer. just this big space. bigger than this room. far bigger than this room. three or four times the size of this room. it wrapped around. a whole floor of a high-rise building in chicago. it was just, kind of remarkable because we didn't have everybody in yet. we were slowly bringing people in but literally we were still getting our servers up. we had telephones ringing. we had people trying to answer phone calls. we are e-mail coming in to our e-mail dress, right? we didn't have a system to receive e-mail in a real way you would want. we have money coming in but we didn't have budgets yet. we had constituency leaders calling our political department bec
with law enforcement encoding, wyoming, trying to find 10-year-old jessica bridgeway. they are trying to find a connection with another child abduction that happened on monday. in the meantime, releasing this video of jessica and they want people to pay close attention to what she looks like. a small gap between her two front teeth and she also has a sore on the bridge of her nose right now, right where her glasses that, or she may not be wearing her glasses. she disappeared on friday while going to be friends with her daily walk to school. the fbi is involved with the search, which has included a home investigation of jessica shared with her mother. law enforcement interviewing the family, not ruling anything out. here are the mother and father. >> everybody that knows me and knows our family knows that we didn't do anything. i know that it is something that has to be done. you know, they have to get it out there. >> they asked me if i thought that she did it, and i said, there is no way. i've never believed that. i mean, same as i would never do something like that. i don't see see
drones are being considered by law enforcement as a cost-cutting way to use technology to fight crime and save lives. stephanie is live with the details. there are fears that the use of these drones could be an invasion of privacy. >> reporter: that's right, concerns over privacy sand civil rights. the sheriff's office is the one dringing this idea up, and it is very preliminary at this point. but here is a picture of a thrown that they tested just two months ago, that the office tested two months ago. a handful of law enforcement agencies in the country have gotten federal approval to use them. and if the sheriff's office does so, it would be the first in california. >> you'll be able to see what the drone is seeing as it's flying. >> reporter: at four pounds and four feet wide, this drone gets a bird's-eye view that officers on the ground are often blind to. >> it can save lives. >> reporter: in this demonstration in dub lick, it's a man standing in the shadows on a roof top with explosives in his reach. >> near priceless. it's valuable to any officer, as you're setting up your peri
first and foremost for assessments of whether this could constitute a violation of a law or a crime. those we leave to the determination of other law enforcement bodies. >> reporter: now, sources tell news4 that other law enforcement authorities, including the u.s. attorney's office, are looking at this contracting mess with jim graham, andhe c ty, and the metro board. now, jim graham is no longer a member of the metro so there's nothing administratively that the metro board here can do to jim graham, based on this report. tom sherwood live at metro. back to you, jim. >> in as much as he is no longer a member of a board, is the metro board now out of it in terms of any kind of sanction or anything? >> reporter: well, the metro board says it has improved its own ethics rules in the last months, as this report has been being prepared. so it technically would be out of it. it s review of other ethics reforms could do to see this doesn't happen again. the big issue here is whether or not jim graham, who has in the past said about this, he's done nothing illegal. he keeps saying that ove
pleading guilty to misconduct in office. delegate tiffany alston was accused of paying a law firm employee $800 in state money of she was also accused of theft and using state funds for her wedding. she will have to perform 300 hours of community service and pay pack the $#00 to the state. -- $800 to the state. >>> lawyers for jerry sandusky say they plan to appeal his sentence. tuesday, a judge sentenced sandusky to a minimum of 30 years in prison. sandusky was convicted earlier this year of sexually abusing 10 children. during tuesday's hearing, some of sandusky's victims testified and described how sandusky's abuse changed their lives. sandusky also addressed the court and again denied any wrongdoing. some of sandusky's victims are suing penn state over how the university responded to the complaints about sandusky. >>> when we come back, we'll talk about a heinous crime. a 14-year-old girl shot for expressing her demand for an education. >>> a ball of flames kept crews pretty busy overnight. we are checking more headlines coming up. ♪ [ male announcer ] the first look...is only the b
the law. and i said they were bad laws. their customs, they were tradition, and we wanted america to be better to live up to the declaration of independence, make real our democracy. when i got arrested the first time this books and i felt free. i felt liberated and today more than ever i feel free in the liberated. abraham lincoln 150 years ago freed the slaves but it took the modern-day civil rights movement to elaborate a nation. [applause] i know some of you are asking where did you get the name "across that bridge," where do to get the title from, life lessons and the vision for change? just like a few short years ago since this is an election year, hundreds and thousands and millions of people come in 11 states and the old confederacy from virginia to texas couldn't register to vote simply cause of the color of their skin. people stood in line. it took a state like the state of mississippi in 1963, 1964, 1965 more than four need to keep those in the but only about 16 those and were registered to vote. there was a county in my native state of alabama and the heart of the blac
, well, no one else can either. instead of providing more money and man power to enforce the law, many politicians across the country are upping the speed limit big time. according to the governor's highway safety association seven states, kansas, kentucky, maine, ohio, pennsylvania, texas and virginia have increased speed limits to as high as 85 miles per hour on certain roads. maybe you're saying it is about time. consider this. there is no doubt excessive speed kills. if you have a need for speed, highway 130 near austin, texas, is where you have to be. later this fall posted legal speed limit 85. >> it is the highest posted speed limit on the whole western hemisphere, right? it is really pretty neat. >> an anomoly? not by a long shot. according to the insurance institute for highway safety, 35 states have raised speed limits to 70 miles per hour or higher, and no one is more aware of that than long distance truckers like anthony frederick, and frankly, it scares him. >> doing 85 miles an hour, all they're doing is asking for more accidents and more deaths, that's about it. they say
of applause for dr. colfax, please. (applause) >> to have a reinvest and recovery act, our stimulus law with the leadership of leader pelosi, of our mayor, of our supervisors, and our community to have $9-1/2 million given to this city and to this area for this. but not just for this, but everybody's already setting this this morning, the local impact, the state impact, the national impact, and indeed the international impact. and i represent a region that is 50 million people. california, arizona, nevada, hawaii, it's a three territories and three countries in the pacific. and i could tell you that i have moved around my region. i've been working with the hiv/aids and other communities throughout our region. do you know how many people have said to me, i got my information through san francisco? (applause) >> that is something to be really proud of. you know, i'll tell you a little bit of a personal story as we -- i move on. imagine september 16th, 1991, your young 29 year old, gay man living in washington, d.c., fulfilling your dream to be a lobbyist. and your physician calls. hi, sam
's unconstitutional to be -- to bar women from combat because it denies them equal protection under the law. >> host: now, you also wrote a novel -- >> guest: i did. >> host: called "sand queen," what is this? >> guest: i'm writing a cycle on the iraq war, fiction and non-fiction combined. it's a woman in iraq at the very beginning of the war, guarding the first and biggest prisoner of war camp we set up over there, and it goes back and forth between her story, her experience as a woman soldier, and the story of an iraqi civilian woman. they meet at a check point, and they begin to interact. in is based on things that my soldiers had experienced, and that you get to see the war from both the iraqi and american point of view, but told through the eyes of women which is a rare way to tell stories of war. >> host: when you look back at the media coverage of the iraq war and currently the afghanistan war, do you feel it's been fair? do you think it's been comprehensive? >> guest: it depends which nation's media you're asking about. >> host: u.s.. >> guest: i think we did a very bad job at the beginning
in 1991 when he was a student at harvard law school. the man she married was later tapped to head the fcc by president obama in 2009. that's 12 years after the couple divorced, by the way. abc news responded saying in part, this is absurd. martha raddatz is known for her tough, fair reporting which is why it was no surprise to her colleagues inside and outside of abc news that she was chosen by the commission on presidential debates for this assignment. a spokesman for paul ryan and the nonpartisan debate commission both said they have no concern over whether raddatz would be impartial during the debate. >> mika, what do you think? >> she's an incredible journalist. i'm not worried about her being objective. >> not in the least. >> i think these things -- i don't know if she disclosed this, but these things should be out there. we should be as transparent as we can about our family connections. >> exactly. >> i don't know if she was. >> everybody thinks martha raddatz is a great reporter. >> she's fantastic. >> one of the best that we have. that said, abc news should have been transparent
the congress and the president today from passing a law that would require full and timely disclosure of contributions to these superpacs and others. the supreme court scission did not do that. they are working for themselves and their party. what we need is campaign finance reform. i will give you a simple principle, that the people who can contribute directly or indirectly are people who can vote. news flash -- corporations and unions cannot vote. it is a simple principle, one of the ones we are exposing to the public, and they overwhelmingly endorsed it. most of these areas -- it is very common sense. that is what the american people respond to. that is not how our politicians treat us. that is part of the problem. >> don't you think it is interesting in all of these really tough times, we have talked all about these big numbers, that the house, the sense, and the white house did not reduce their salaries? think about it. >> do you think they should? >> if you were in business, you would have to. they need to set the first example of making the cut back for themselves. >> leading b
most of the financial institute would say listen, we would go ahead and we would be making more laws, we would be investing more on behalf of the people we represent. but we are not going to make loans -- we will see on the cpb there was a credit card act of 2009 there was a provision, it is an example of the pendulum swing too far one way, that if you were, it was pretty specific, if you were a stay-at-home mom, not a number of a household, so you could be married, have a full-time companion, if that other person work and used it on, you couldn't get access to credit. because you didn't have a job to stay home. now, the cfpb didn't fix it. of everyone else feels about the cpb in terms of the kind thing system are not doing but that's one thing i think they did get right. but that's just one small example of a credit issue. >> look, dodd-frank was written in anger. it was. people are angry and they're trying to cover up their own involvement in this deal. the second thing about that, it had 250 some required new regulations, and 150 some suggested new regulations. >> many of which ha
for the infrastructure needed to address it. >> opponents stay the state's human trafficking laws are already working. but supporters say it will give law enforcement another tool. >>> california corrections officials face a january deadline to lay out their plan for the inmate population. a federal three-judge panel has set that deadline. the state has been given until june to reduce the sentences. corrections officials say it would put them over the court imposed cap. >>> well, a judge is expected to dismiss a discrimination lawsuit filed against the city of oakland by one of its own officers. the chauncey bailey project reports that in a tenttive decision, a judge rejected discrimination claims made by sergeant derwin longmeyer. a judge said there was insufficient evidence for discrimination. longmeyer investigated the killing of chauncey bailey. >>> solano county law enforcement worked through the night to expose homemade explosives found in a vallejo home. [ sirens ] >> the bomb squad detonated explosives recover at a house in the 3700 block of georgia street. the blast rattled windows and even
prosecutors have launched a new robe into the finances of jesse jackson, jr. law enforcement sources tell nbc news the investigation involves an alleged misuse of funds monitored by congress. but there are no specifics tonight. attorneys met with prosecutors this week in an effort to persuade them not to indict the illinois congressman. jackson has been on medical leave from congress since june. >>> now, a disturbing attack today. someone fired shots into the campaign headquarters for president obama in denver. the bullet shattered a large front window, but no one was hurt. police believe the shot was fired from a vehicle. tontd, both sides are claiming victory in the viesz presidential debate. president obama watched from air force 1. mitt romney was in richmond today. but did the debate swing undecide ds voters? nbc news talked about who they saw as the winner. >> the vice president did? >> why? >> i think he came off as being very strong, emotional. >> vice president biden was being kind of immature with a lot of the skiend of snide sniers and everything. >> the next presidential debate, b
in the other financial institutions and the answer is that there is no law that they could hang them on. they could find nothing illegal and it wasn't for the want of trying and that's why we've still not seen the high level executives go to jail and why they are trying to push forward all of this nonsense financial reform the haven't been able to do. >> i don't know if it was for want of trying. >> you have the attorney general and the banks to own the place as upset about the senate. there wasn't an urge to prosecute. there were three questions i just want to be fair to affairs if you could change any part of the book, what would it be? >> that's a good question. i wonder if they mean if i would have written something or if the book history could have been different. >> if i would have written something differently that is an interesting question. i would like to have actually talked to kerry killinger, so that would have changed. i could have spent the entire book talking about the last month because there were so many politics and the decision appeared. >> has anyone been fascinated
they don't get together for thanksgiving. pressures mounting on eric holder to speak out on laws wanting to loosen marijuana laws. they are set to decide whether or not to decriminalize pot possess. holder criticized california's laws two years ago. dan springer is on this. how close are the two states to passing legalization, dan in. >> i tell you, bill, right now legalization is leading in the polls in two of those states, in washington in colorado, it's trailing in oregon. the folks who are trying to keep marijuana illegal are getting badly out spent especially here in washington state where it's $6,000 to $4 million. most of the politicians inee seattle are for it. even the childrens alliance endorsed legalization saying drug laws are enforced unevenly and are hurting the minorities and poor. >> if those kids parents are shutout of housing and employment and ed indication alopportunities for not helping those kids. >> critics say just the opposite, that if more kids are exposed to marijuana, usage among kids will go up, bill. bill: has the obama administration taken a position on thi
of weeks after signing the massachusetts health care law, where he clearly knew better and was willing to say so. let's listen to this. >> there ought to be enough money to help people get insurance. because an insured individual has a better chance of having an excellent medical experience than one who is not. an insured individual is more likely to go to a primary care physician or a clinic to get evaluated for their conditions or to get early treatment, to get pharmaceutical treatment, as opposed to showing up at the emergency room where the treatment is more expensive and less effective than if they got preventative and primary care. >> governor dean, what changed for governor romney in six years? >> he's running for president with a really conservative base. >> i guess so. >> this is a guy who doesn't appear to have too many inner principles. these guys really are totally out of touch with what goes on. let's just suppose he's right and you get to the hospital and you have a heart attack and you have no insurance. the government does not pick that up and neither does the charity.
by state law. >>> new at 10:00, city leaders in concord are looking into ways to crack down on outdoor medical marijuana grows after seeing our report about a backyard pot operation last week. eric rasmussen is live in concord and figures out concord isn't the only city where neighbors are reporting problems. erick. >> reporter: right prong, we just heard about another backyard grow -- right frank, we just heard about another backyard grow possibly bigger than the one we saw in concord. they are both legal. it's what's under this large plastic at the present time in the backyard of a house in pittsburg. >> the smell is horrendous. absolutely horrendous. at one point we counted 60 plants in the backyard. >> reporter: medical marijuana plants that jordan worries will make his neighborhood a target for crime. city leaders say they're looking into drafting an ordnance to restrict where and how the plants are grown. >> perhaps looking at having the growth indoors instead of outdoors that certainly would take care of some of the major concerns that we have. >> reporter: it's something the gr
it up, put it up. >> reporter: this judge sided with the american freedom law center recently after it filed suit against washington metro transit because they rekwefrted a delay in putting the posters up. >> i mean, i don't thing it's speech if they're try to advertise. >> reporter: today, those posters will be put up at the u street metro station as well as stations at tacoma park and glen mount. she already has successfully placed the posters on trains in new york city and buses in san francisco. most posters have not gone up yet. we have not gotten a time line as to when they will go up yet. live at the u street metro station, tony tall, tal, news 4. >>> meteorologist veronica johnson is in for tom kierein and joins us. >> still a little chilly. well, it's going to stay chilly today, guys. i'm sure you've noticed all the clouds we've got across the area. a few sprirnkles and light showers. it's going to be chilly. on top of that, it's going to be wet later today. we started out this morning in the 30s and 40s. it was our coldest start in more than five months. a look at the read
or professional ballots, if it's that close, might have the other person's name on it. >> i don't know how the law would judge this. presumably they could say, well, this is the republican ticket. somebody is voting for. on the other happen, they may say, no, if mitt romney is on there and it's not paul ryan at the top of the ticket, that invalidates that vote. i think these would be legal battles that would probably make the 2000 controversy between gore and bush seem ke a little tempest in the tea pot. >> lenny, tony perkins often brags about how you were his professor at au and all that. i wish you were one my professors. you're fantastic. >> well, thank you. >> thank you for joining us today. >> see you next time. >> see you next time. >> bye-bye. >> there is the answer. interesting. you would think -- but as lenny said, so many people -- if you get to that point, you really want this. >> has to be something unusual that would happen -- >> like eagleton. if you have a question you would like answered, send it to myfoxdc.com, click on the morning tab for a link to ask allison. >> good stuff. >>
subcommittee he passed laws related to all the issues i mentioned, child care, family medical leave, education, child health and child abuse prevention. someone to thank senator dodd for all that, but also for inspiring this report, and i turned over to to you. [applause] >> well, good morning, and it's wonderful to see such a great turnout this morning, to be a part of this news of this report card. i'm delighted to be with you. i think very much first focus for their work as well as save the children, that in place to be associated with for many, many years, and proud of the fact that they are located connecticut as well. we like things local pride, and to bob casey, my former colleague and different from pennsylvania who is just a tremendous job. he said wonderful commitment in history deeply committed to the issue children and families, to the united states congress. so it's an honor to be with them. jennifer, we thank you immensely. you've let your celebrity but also your mind and your commitment to these issues, and we thank you immensely for the work you do. being a mother herself of yo
rights. i'm sure there are some lawyers or law students here in the room, and when you read the book and you read legal documents about declaration, the accord in 1920, you understand that there are gigabytes, international 19 legal rights of jews to the land. but there's something else which i haven't found elsewhere when i wrote the book, and i call it the common sense right. when you go to a war and you win a war, you don't give land you wondering that were. and what's happening now, since we won the war, and the side that was aggressive and started the war is coming to us and saying, you know what? i want my land back. it doesn't work that way. even here in the u.s. when it was with mexico, and you want, nobody came to you and told you, you know what, we lost the war, we want our land back. and i think the common sense right is something that states very straight to you. and our neighbors should know that if they would start another war with us, they would not keep any price. on the contrary, if you lose, you lose. and i think talking about the right is something very important t
. he saw is what all the way to the top of the harvard law review and the content of the review, top editor. everything is done is clean as a whistle but he's not only breaking any law, he's never anything wrong. he's the perfect father, the perfect husband, the perfect american. all we do is trash the guy. >> so that's the bar being set for the presidency. he hasn't broken any law. okay. i think we all can accept the nomination for the presidency. look, the only trashing that has been done over the last three and a half years is to our economy and/or international stature, and that is been done by this president. and actually chris, i personally have coveted president obama many times, and all of you listen to my show now i cut it is fair and balanced. look, president obama might not know a lot about economics, but he does i mean karaoke. so let's just celebrate that. let's all hold hands, so in love with you. i mean, come on. imagine mitt romney doing that. i'm so in love with you. oh, come on. i'm sorry. i know this is mrc but you've got to give it to both sides. our second obamag
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